In one month, 28 children die of suspected encephalitis in Bihar's Muzaffarpur district -Amarnath Tewary

-The Hindu

High temperature during summer, along with humidity more than the normal, is considered to be an ideal situation for the outbreak of Acute Encephalitis Syndrome, say doctors.

Patna:
At least 28 children have died in the last one month in Muzaffarpur district of north Bihar, allegedly due to Acute Encephalitis Syndrome (AES), which is locally known as Chamki bukhar (brain fever).

Chief Minister Nitish Kumar, has expressed concern over the rising deaths of children in Muzaffarpur. He said, “A team of doctors and medical experts have been sent to Muzaffarpur to monitor the situation and also speed up the awareness drive about complexities and preventive measures about AES”.

“Till last night, 28 children have lost their lives…we’ve started two separate Intensive Care Units (ICU) along with other makeshift wards in the government hospital”, Muzaffarpur civil surgeon Dr. Shailendera Prasad Singh told The Hindu over phone.

Earlier on Monday, Principal Secretary of the Health Department Sanajy Kumar said the deaths were caused by Hypoglycemia (deficiency of glucose or sugar in the blood stream), and not by the fever. He, however, added that “48 suspected AES cases have been recorded so far in the district”.

On Tuesday, Union Minister of State for Health and Family Welfare Ashwani Kumar Choubey said in Patna that “since state government officials were engaged in election-related works in the recent past months they could not make the awareness drive as it should have been…we’re careful and taking all measures to tackle the situation of death of children in Muzaffarpur”.

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The Hindu, 11 June, 2019, https://www.thehindu.com/news/national/in-one-month-28-children-die-of-suspected-encephalitis-in-muzaffarpur/article27816724.ece?homepage=true

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