India Records 22% Drop in Maternal Mortality Rate

-PTI

UP registers 30% decline in MMR, while three states – Kerala, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu – have already met the Sustainable Development Goal target of 70 deaths per 1,00,000 live births.

New Delhi:
India has registered a significant decline in Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) recording a 22% reduction in such deaths since 2013, according to the Sample Registration System (SRS) bulletin released on June 7.

The MMR has declined from 167 in 2011-2013 to 130 in 2014-2016, according to the special bulletin.

MMR is defined as the proportion of maternal deaths per 1,00,000 live births.

The decline has been most significant in Empowered Action Group (EAG) states – from 246 to 188, it said.

The Special Bulletin of Maternal Mortality in India stated that among the southern states, the decline has been from 93 to 77 and in “other” states from 115 to 93.

“The latest SRS figures reveal that we have gone beyond the MDG target of Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) of 139 by 2015 & have reached 130!! I congratulate the Ministry, @MoHFW_India and the states for their joint efforts,” Union Health Minister J P Nadda said on Twitter.

According to the SRS Bulletin, there were nearly 12,000 fewer maternal deaths in 2016 as compared to 2013, with the total number of maternal deaths for the first time reducing to 32,000, according to a Health Ministry statement.

This means that every day 30 more pregnant women are now being saved in India as compared to 2013.

Amongst the states, Uttar Pradesh with 30% decline has topped the chart in the reduction of maternal deaths. Three states have already met the SDG target for MMR of 70 per 1,00,000.

These are Kerala, Maharashtra and Tamil Nadu, while Andhra Pradesh and Telangana are within striking distance.

Please click here to read more.

TheWire.in, 7 June, 2018, https://thewire.in/health/maternal-mortality-ratio-india-decline

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