Thomas Piketty & Angus Deaton help frame Rahul Gandhi's minimum income promise -DK Singh

-ThePrint.in

British economist Angus Deaton, a 2015 Nobel Prize winner, and French economist Thomas Piketty are helping Congress shape its minimum income scheme.

New Delhi:
Angus Deaton, the British economist who won the Nobel Prize in 2015, and French economist Thomas Piketty are advising the Congress on its ambitious poll promise of minimum income guarantee (MIG) to the poor, party leaders have told ThePrint.

Congress president Rahul Gandhi declared Monday that the party would provide the income guarantee if voted to power in May. Although he did not specify the amount, party sources indicated that it would be ‘anything above Rs 10,000 per month’ per household. This is, however, likely to change, depending on what the Modi government offers in terms of its poll sops in the coming days.

Congress sources said that the party reached out to Deaton and Piketty as Gandhi has studied their works. Piketty’s much-acclaimed book, Capital in the Twenty-First Century, dealt with how inequality grew since the industrial revolution and wealth got concentrated in a few rich families — a favourite subject of the Congress president who has been attacking the Narendra Modi government for allegedly making the rich richer and the poor poorer. The Economist called Piketty “the modern Marx”.

Deaton has also done extensive work on income inequality, poverty and health, especially in the Indian context, and has co-authored many works with Amartya Sen, another Nobel Laureate, and Jean Dreze, a former member of Sonia Gandhi-led National Advisory Council during the UPA regime.

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ThePrint.in, 31 January, 2019, https://theprint.in/politics/behind-rahul-gandhis-minimum-income-promise-a-nobel-laureate-modern-marx/185532/?fbclid=IwAR1EImDct99h6nYtqkP6yVgSXYeF1Izb1Dv_PS08k69mnnVSlW

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