RTI and National Security: Contradiction or Confluence? | PK Dey Memorial Lecture (Source: IIHS Channel)

 

Published On: 13 March, 2017 | Duration: 2 hours, 18 min, 05 sec

 

In a democratic country, open debate and discussion on issues like nationalism, security and defence are as important as discussion on matters of development and politics. These deliberations are likely to foster a more mature, robust and effective framework of how a nation views its own security issues. Air Marshal Dey, in whose memory this lecture is being organised, was known for encouraging transparency, dialogue, and debate as a means for better decision making. He believed that blanket secrecy was always a weakness, and it was important to identify the areas where transparency would be encouraged to ensure greater efficiency and a stronger and more secure nation. He also believed securing peace was the real objective of a "defence" service.

 

The 2nd memorial lecture in his memory has been delivered by India's first Chief Central Information Commissioner (CIC), former Civil Servant, and former Chairperson of the Minorities Commission Wajahat Habibullah who has dealt with these issues while in service, and while serving as the head of important statutory bodies. He has also consistently held that public engagement on such issues are both practical, and necessary.

 

The 1st Air Marshal PK Dey Memorial Lecture on Transparency in Defence and Security was delivered by the former Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Ramdas titled "Discussing Security and Insecurity in our Democratic Framework: Transparency and Accountability in Defence" on 2nd April 2016, at the same venue.

 

It is hoped that this series of lectures will foster public engagement between "experts" and citizens, and build a body of knowledge which will lead to better policy-making and a more transparent, secure, and confident nation.

 

The lecture is being organised by the School for Democracy and family members of Air Marshal PK Dey.

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