Unemployment

Unemployment

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Please click here, here and here to read the key findings of the report entitled Time Use in India-2019, January-December 2019 (released in September 2020), prepared by National Statistical Office, Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation.

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Please click here to read the Briefing Note for Parliamentarians on Labour Law Reforms prepared by Working Peoples' Charter dated 21st September, 2020.

Please click here to read The Code on Social Security 2020.

Please click here to read The Occupational Safety, Health and Working Conditions Code 2020.

Please click here to read The Industrial Relations Code 2020.  

Please click here to read The Code on Wages 2019.

Please click here to access the Parliamentary Standing Committee Report on Labour 2019-20, The Code on Social Security 2019 (released in July 2020), Ninth Report, Seventeenth Lok Sabha.

Please click here to access the Parliamentary Standing Committee Report on Labour 2019-20, The Industrial Relations Code 2019 (released in April 2020), Eighth Report, Seventeenth Lok Sabha.

Please click here to access the Parliamentary Standing Committee Report on Labour 2019-20, The Occupational Safety, Health and Working Conditions Code 2019 (released in February 2020), Fourth Report, Seventeenth Lok Sabha.

Please click here to access the Parliamentary Standing Committee Report on Labour 2018-19, The Code on Wages Bill 2017 (released in December 2018), Forty Third Report, Sixteenth Lok Sabha.

Please click here to access the Parliamentary Standing Committee Report on Labour 2014-15, The Factories (Amendment) Bill 2014 (released in December 2014), Third Report, Sixteenth Lok Sabha.

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The key findings of the report entitled Tackling the COVID-19 youth employment crisis in Asia and the Pacific (released on 18th August, 2020) by Asian Development Bank (ADB) and International Labour Organisation (ILO), are as follows (please click here to access)

• Under 3-months containment scenario (short containment), in India, the equivalent of 4.1 million youth jobs may be lost, followed by Pakistan with 1.5 million jobs lost.

• Under 6-months containment scenario (long containment), in India, the equivalent of 6.1 million youth jobs may be lost, followed by Pakistan with 2.3 million jobs lost.

• In Fiji (29.8 percent), India (29.5 percent) and Mongolia (28.5 percent), the youth unemployment rate may rise to near 30 percent, and may be just over that level in Sri Lanka (32.5 percent) under short containment (3-months).

• Under long containment (6-months), youth unemployment rate may increase to 32.5 percent in India.

• The highest proportion of youth job loss among the seven sectors in India would be felt in agriculture (28.8 percent), followed by construction (24.6 percent), retail trade (9.0 percent), inland transport (5.7 percent), textiles and textile products (4.2 percent), other services  (3.1 percent) and hotels and restaurants (1.9 percent). The other sectors of the economy would be responsible for 22.7 percent of youth job losses.    

• Job loss among youth will continue throughout 2020 and could result in youth unemployment rates doubling. Between 10 and 15 million youth jobs (full-time equivalent) may be lost across 13 countries in Asia and the Pacific in 2020. These estimates are based on the expected fall in output and consequent decrease in labour demand for the year relative to a non-COVID-19 scenario. The estimates include large countries, such as India and Indonesia, as well as small ones such as Fiji and Nepal.

• Disruptions of work-based learning have also been significant, with impacts on the provision of apprenticeships and internships. Responses to a survey on the COVID-19 impact on staff development and training with public and private enterprises and other organizations indicate that, in India, two thirds of firm-level apprenticeships and three quarters of internships were completely interrupted. Despite this, six of ten companies in India continued to provide wages or stipends to apprentices and interns.

• The biggest challenges that firms cited as preventing continued apprenticeships and internships were (1) difficulties in delivering hands-on training, (2) infrastructure issues (in
both countries), (3) limited digital literacy of users (in India), and (4) cost (in the Philippines).

• The Global survey on staff development and training in the context of COVID-19 pandemic for public and private enterprises and other organizations was launched by ten international and regional development partners, including ADB and the ILO. Responses cited in this report are based on a sample of 71 firms operating in India and 183 firms operating in the Philippines – noting that a different number of respondents answered each question. At the time of writing, survey results were not yet published.

 



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