ASER report 2017: More rural teens staying back in school but struggle with reading, math; girls worse off -Shradha Chettri & Uma Vishnu

Share this article Share this article
published Published on Jan 17, 2018   modified Modified on Jan 17, 2018
-The Indian Express

It finds that while the youth are high on aspiration (about 60% wanted to study beyond Class 12), they are short on vital, everyday skills that are needed to help them get to where they aspire.

New Delhi:
Boys and girls in rural India between 14 and 18 years of age are most likely to be in school or even college with access to a mobile phone, they may even have a bank account to their names but are most likely to struggle with elementary math and English. Only four out of ten can, on a map, point to the state they live in.

The latest Annual Status of Education Report (ASER), carried out by NGO Pratham and released in New Delhi on Tuesday, finds that while 86% of youth in the 14-18 age group are still in the formal education system (school or college) and 73% students had used a mobile phone within the last week, more than half of them (57%) struggle to do simple Class 2-level division.

Unlike earlier surveys, which measured learning levels in the 5-to-16 age group, ASER 2017 focused on 14- to 18-year-olds — those who have moved just beyond elementary school age and are on the threshold of adulthood. As they enter this crucial phase, do they have the required knowledge, skills and opportunities that prepares them for life?

The study attempts to answer this by looking at skills beyond foundational reading and arithmetic and focusing on four As — activity (what they are doing), ability (level of basic skills), awareness (their access to media, traditional and new) and aspirations.

It finds that while the youth are high on aspiration (about 60% wanted to study beyond Class 12), they are short on vital, everyday skills that are needed to help them get to where they aspire.

A pointer to this aspiration is how most children in the age group continue to stay within the formal education system even though the Right to Education umbrella folds up at age 14: 86% of youth were in school or college. More than half (54%) of them were in Class 10 or below and only 14 not enrolled anywhere.

Please click here to read more.

The Indian Express, 17 January, 2018, http://indianexpress.com/article/education/aser-report-2017-more-rural-teens-staying-back-in-school-but-struggle-with-reading-math-girls-worse-off-5027876/


Related Articles

 

Write Comments

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

Video Archives

Archives

share on Facebook
Twitter
RSS
Feedback
Read Later

Contact Form

Please enter security code
      Close